The endemic Turks & Caicos Rock Iguanas are the main focus of the three-year Darwin Plus project whose main objective is to further the conservation of the rock iguanas and other native reptiles to secure a future for these unique and highly threatened species.

The grand launch of the project is scheduled on Friday, April 7, 2017 at Opus Conference Centre on Providenciales.  

A strong partnership is established between six organizations whose expertise and commitment guarantees to deliver set goals. They are the following:

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), UK

Turks & Caicos National Trust

Department of Environment and Coastal Resources

Department of Agriculture

San Diego Zoo Global, USA

Big Ambergris Cay Facilities Ltd.

The above-mentioned organizations will work together initially to design biosecurity for Little Water Cay and Big Ambergris Cay. The second phase of the project will focus on implementing necessary actions resulting from the findings, following the biosecurity surveillance activities in phase one. This will include improved control of invasive species on Little Water Cay (“Iguana Island”), particularly rodents and understanding the impact of feral cats, which threatened the iguana populations there. Steps taken will also ensure rats, feral cats and other potential harmful species do not become established and threaten the iguanas and native reptiles. This is especially important for Big Ambergris Cay where there are currently no rats and feral cats. Feral cats and rats are a problem because they eat young iguanas and their eggs. The rats compete for food with iguanas, e.g. they eat fruits of native vegetation such as Sea Grape.

In addition, the project will also deal with additional offshore cays where iguana populations exist – check to see if rats are present and identify which cays should be the main focus for future restoration.

The Darwin Plus Project will last for 3 years and costs £370,000 (app. 460,000 USD). This will be £200k from Darwin and £170k match funding provided by RSPB and San Diego Zoo Global.

For more information about the launch and the project, please contact the Turks & Caicos National Trust at (649) 941-5710 or e-mail info@tcnationaltrust.org.


The endemic Turks & Caicos Rock Iguanas are the main focus of the three-year Darwin Plus project whose main objective is to further the conservation of the rock iguanas and other native reptiles to secure a future for these unique and highly threatened species.

The grand launch of the project is scheduled on Friday, April 7, 2017 at Opus Conference Centre on Providenciales.  

A strong partnership is established between six organizations whose expertise and commitment guarantees to deliver set goals. They are the following:

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), UK

Turks & Caicos National Trust

Department of Environment and Coastal Resources

Department of Agriculture

San Diego Zoo Global, USA

Big Ambergris Cay Facilities Ltd.

The above-mentioned organizations will work together initially to design biosecurity for Little Water Cay and Big Ambergris Cay. The second phase of the project will focus on implementing necessary actions resulting from the findings, following the biosecurity surveillance activities in phase one. This will include improved control of invasive species on Little Water Cay (“Iguana Island”), particularly rodents and understanding the impact of feral cats, which threatened the iguana populations there. Steps taken will also ensure rats, feral cats and other potential harmful species do not become established and threaten the iguanas and native reptiles. This is especially important for Big Ambergris Cay where there are currently no rats and feral cats. Feral cats and rats are a problem because they eat young iguanas and their eggs. The rats compete for food with iguanas, e.g. they eat fruits of native vegetation such as Sea Grape.

In addition, the project will also deal with additional offshore cays where iguana populations exist – check to see if rats are present and identify which cays should be the main focus for future restoration.

The Darwin Plus Project will last for 3 years and costs £370,000 (app. 460,000 USD). This will be £200k from Darwin and £170k match funding provided by RSPB and San Diego Zoo Global.

For more information about the launch and the project, please contact the Turks & Caicos National Trust at (649) 941-5710 or e-mail info@tcnationaltrust.org.


The endemic Turks & Caicos Rock Iguanas are the main focus of the three-year Darwin Plus project whose main objective is to further the conservation of the rock iguanas and other native reptiles to secure a future for these unique and highly threatened species.

The grand launch of the project is scheduled on Friday, April 7, 2017 at Opus Conference Centre on Providenciales.  

A strong partnership is established between six organizations whose expertise and commitment guarantees to deliver set goals. They are the following:

Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), UK

Turks & Caicos National Trust

Department of Environment and Coastal Resources

Department of Agriculture

San Diego Zoo Global, USA

Big Ambergris Cay Facilities Ltd.

The above-mentioned organizations will work together initially to design biosecurity for Little Water Cay and Big Ambergris Cay. The second phase of the project will focus on implementing necessary actions resulting from the findings, following the biosecurity surveillance activities in phase one. This will include improved control of invasive species on Little Water Cay (“Iguana Island”), particularly rodents and understanding the impact of feral cats, which threatened the iguana populations there. Steps taken will also ensure rats, feral cats and other potential harmful species do not become established and threaten the iguanas and native reptiles. This is especially important for Big Ambergris Cay where there are currently no rats and feral cats. Feral cats and rats are a problem because they eat young iguanas and their eggs. The rats compete for food with iguanas, e.g. they eat fruits of native vegetation such as Sea Grape.

In addition, the project will also deal with additional offshore cays where iguana populations exist – check to see if rats are present and identify which cays should be the main focus for future restoration.

The Darwin Plus Project will last for 3 years and costs £370,000 (app. 460,000 USD). This will be £200k from Darwin and £170k match funding provided by RSPB and San Diego Zoo Global.

For more information about the launch and the project, please contact the Turks & Caicos National Trust at (649) 941-5710 or e-mail info@tcnationaltrust.org.

Copyright: Turks and Caicos National Trust (1992-2016)
P.O.Box 540, #50 Salt Mills Plaza, Grace Bay, Providenciales, Turks & Caicos Islands. Tel: (649) 941 5710 Fax: (649) 941 4258 E-Mail: info@tcnationaltrust.org

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